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Faces on Book

There’s a new craze on facebook; a craze that oddly enough is especially successful in South America. Faces on Book is the facebook profile and project of an artist, who is drawing facebook profile pictures relentlessly in, what we could only call, random acts of kindness.

There’s no info or connection to be made as to who the artist is. The only info on his profile reads as follows:
“One day I was sitting in the train going home from work. The train was quite empty so I sat there almost alone reading a book. When a guy comes in and sits right behind me, I noticed him because of the noisy hills lady shoes he was wearing. When the conductor comes to check his ticket he hasn’t and runs away. When I walked out of the train at my stop I found these pictures laying next to his seat. The pictures were all black, so I thought: “Whatever, I’d better check facebook”.”

The way it works is very easy. You look for Faces on Book and befriend him. Once he drew your profile picture he will accept the friendship and tag you in it. Since he is receiving an incredible amount of requests (528 friends and 685 drawings to date) it will probably take a while, but it’s worth it.

The identity is a big mystery and leads to a lot of curiosity, as one can read in the blog posts of my South American co-bloggers. The reactions though are incredibly friendly and enchanted rather than nosy. A reaction that makes me very happy, since I believe that Faces on Book’s acts of kindness bring the social back into a network that rather seems to estrange people in their staged presentation of themselves than that it helps bringing them together.

Being a facebook victim myself (despite having the excuse to be networking professionally) you can take it from me.

Of course we know who the artist is, but wanna respect the artist’s wish. I can promise you thought that we will keep you posted on this and on the artist’s identity.



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